X
Groove3

Music Notation: Preparing Scores and Parts

  4.5   (1)  - log in to review

Online Access
$1066 $1599 Purchase
Site All-Access Pass
$15 /month Get Your Pass

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
CHAPTER 1: Getting Started
1. Choosing Your Tools: By Hand Vs. By Computer
2. Scores By Hand
3. Computer-Generated Scores
4. Summary: Getting Started
CHAPTER 2: Laying Out the Score
1. Basic Elements Of The Score
2. Score Order
3. Score Page Layouts
4. Measure Numbers And Rehearsal Markings
5. Summary: Laying Out The Score
CHAPTER 3: The Contents of the Score
1. Barlines, Clefs, Key/Time Signatures
2. Notes
3. Dynamics, Articulations, And Accidentals
4. Divisi Parts
5. Words And Performance Directions In The Score
6. Repeat Notation And Form Markings
7. Rhythm-Section Notation And Improvisation
8. Text Setting And Vocal Notation
9. Finishing The Score
10. Summary: Entering The Contents Of The Score
CHAPTER 4: Creating Parts
1. Choosing The Tools
2. Parts By Hand
3. Parts By Computer
4. Laying Out The Parts
5. Sample Parts
6. Proofreading And Editing
AFTERWORD
APPENDIX A. Instrument Names and Abbreviations
APPENDIX B. Resources
APPENDIX C. Common Errors
ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Whether you notate music by hand or use computer software, this digital book will show you today's best practices for rendering the details of your scores and parts. Improve your music's legibility and express your ideas clearly to get the best possible representation of your music today!

 

In this digital book you'll learn to create scores that are easy to conduct and parts that are easy to perform, understand the unique practices and standards for handwritten vs. computer-generated scores, such as those by Finale® and Sibelius®, lay out scores with proper instrument order, measures per page, and common alignment practices.

 

You'll also learn to understand the publication standards for orchestral, big-band, vocal, and rhythm-section-based scores, use appropriate practices for different styles, such as pop, commercial, classical, jazz and more. 

 

Furthermore, Music Notation – Preparing Scores and Parts is used as a notation textbook by Berklee College of Music's Contemporary Writing and Production Department, and presents the definitive word in score and part preparation, based on contemporary publishing-industry practice.

Key Digital Print Features

We've built a new way to enjoy electronic print that you're sure to love.

  • Fast Loading Desktop and Mobile Experience (even with cellular connections!)
  • Auto-resume across devices
  • Quick search, note taking and bookmarking for easy reference
  • Responsive book design, so things look great on mobile too
  • * Internet connection required *
JGGNV
Submitted 2 months ago

Very good

This is an excellent book on music notation. I do have two comments. What about producing notation for tablets? I've been reading music on tablets since 2003 (remember the old MusicPad Pro? and now the iPad). I also question whether now, 14 years after the book was published, if instrumentalists playing in an ensemble have not become use to 8.5x11" paper and computer generated scores? I've never had any negative comments when giving an ensemble letter sized paper. Also most computer programs allow you to format your score in any size and then print to any size paper you want to, no photocopying needed.

I am a: Musician, Reaper

Ease of Use
 
 
 
 
 
Quality of Videos
 
 
 
 
 
Value of Training
 
 
 
 
 
Access to Videos
 
 
 
 
 

Matthew Nicholl

Products by Matthew

  • image description
    tutorial video

    Music Notation: Preparing Scores and Parts

    Whether you notate music by hand or use computer software, this digital book will show you today's best practices for rendering the details of your scores and parts. Improve your music's legibility and express your ideas clearly to get the best possible representation of your music today!

Music Notation: Preparing Scores and Parts is rated 4.5 out of 5 by 1 .
Rated 4.0 out of 5 by from Very good This is an excellent book on music notation. I do have two comments. What about producing notation for tablets? I've been reading music on tablets since 2003 (remember the old MusicPad Pro? and now the iPad). I also question whether now, 14 years after the book was published, if instrumentalists playing in an ensemble have not become use to 8.5x11" paper and computer generated scores? I've never had any negative comments when giving an ensemble letter sized paper. Also most computer programs allow you to format your score in any size and then print to any size paper you want to, no photocopying needed.
Date published: 2021-02-21
We use cookies to personalize content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyze our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. By continuing to use this site you agree to the use of cookies. View Privacy Policy