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Strymon Tutorial

Ambient Patches with Strymon BigSky

  3.0   (1)  - log in to review
7 Videos
Length: 36min 23sec
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    Tutorial 1

    User Interface

    5:57

    Learn your way around BigSky's controls and menus.

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    Tutorial 2

    Creating an Ambient Patch

    6:02

    Start building a patch using the Bloom reverb type, and learn about the Decay, Length, Tone, and Feedback parameters.

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    Tutorial 3

    Parameter Knobs & Expression Pedal

    3:43

    Assign the Parameter 1 and 2 knobs, as well as the expression pedal, for controlling parameters during performance.

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    Tutorial 4

    Persist & Hold

    4:08

    Learn how the Persist and Hold parameters work.

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    Tutorial 5

    Name & Save

    3:19

    See how to name and save your presets, as well as how to save to multiple locations.

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    Tutorial 6

    Shimmer Reverb

    7:42

    Create two presets using the pitch-shifting Shimmer reverb type, exploring multiple setups with the two pitch-shifted voices.

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    Tutorial 7

    Cloud Reverb

    5:32

    Build a preset from start to finish using the Cloud reverb type, exploring different Diffusion and Modulation settings.

Few pedals lend themselves to creating lush sonic dreamscapes like the Strymon BigSky. In this video tutorial series, Strymon expert Matt Piper shows you everything you need to know to create wild, evolving ambient patches with this powerful effect pedal.

Matt begins by exploring the user interface of the Strymon BigSky, showing you how to access its presets and parameters from the knobs and switches on the pedal.

Then Matt dives right into demonstrating how to build a patch, using the Bloom reverb, and customizing the Decay, Length, Feedback, and Tone controls to create just the soundscape youre looking for.

Matt now explores the assignable parameter knobs and expression pedal, so you can perform with your new patch live. After that, Matt covers the Persist and Hold parameters, showing you how they affect parameters in a given patch.

From there, youll see how to name and save your presets, save the same preset to multiple locations, and see the creation process of two patches, using the Shimmer reverb machine and more.

Finally, Matt reveals how to create a preset from start to finish using the Cloud reverb type, exploring different Diffusion and Modulation settings.

If youve got a Strymon BigSky pedal and are looking into how to make great hardware-based ambient textures, Ambient Patches with Strymon BigSky is what you need to watch!

Jake
Submitted 6 months ago

Barely covered the unit

Way too much time wasted on saving. There are many more settings that were never covered - magneto for instance. The only reverb types covered were cloud, shimmer and bloom.

I am a: Semi-Pro

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1. When did you start dabbling in music?

I started coming up with little ditties on the piano at age five, which were simple, but I would memorize them and add them to my repertoire. Got my first guitar at age ten (was playing my father's guitar a bit before that), my first synth at age 16, and my first multi-track recorder not long after that.

2. What training have you had?

Most of my technical training has been on the job or self-acquired. I gained a lot of technical troubleshooting chops working at M-Audio customer support at a time when they were distributing Propellerhead Reason and Ableton Live in addition to their own audio and MIDI interfaces and keyboards. Though mostly self-taught on musical instruments, I studied some jazz guitar theory at the Grove School of Music in Los Angeles, and also took a few private lessons with Ted Greene (Chord Chemistry) and Adam Levine.

3. When did you get into recording?

Sometime early in high school I got a dual cassette deck that could do overdubbing, and I started making tracks with that. A couple of years afterward, I got a Tascam 4-track cassette recorder, and by that time I had a synth, a drum machine, a guitar, and a bass. When I was 19 I moved to Los Angeles, and soon began building and wiring (with many self-inflicted solder burns) a recording studio with my friend who had just graduated from an audio engineering program. I learned a lot from him and from recording in the studio. Later I got a job at Westlake Recording Studios in Los Angeles, where I was allowed to record during off hours. (Michael Jackson's Thriller was recorded there.)

4. People you have worked with/for?

I mentioned working for M-Audio, where I started in customer support and eventually moved to writing user manuals. During that time (in my free time on nights and weekends) I had the opportunity to write books for Thompson Course Technology/Cengage Learning about how to use Propellerhead Reason software, and the two books I did as a solo author maintained 5-star ratings on Amazon. I eventually left M-Audio to go work for Line 6 as their US Product Specialist for Propellerhead products, and got to travel around the country leading clinics at music schools and recording studios and doing trade shows, and also created numerous tutorial videos. Currently I teach classes at the Los Angeles College of Music in Pasadena, California, including Fundamentals of Synthesis. I also consult for various music technology companies, including regularly creating online content for Strymon, and I enjoy working on music in my own studio.

Why are you so good at training people?

When I first started writing about subtractive synthesis about ten years ago, I decided that in order to properly explain a complex concept, I would try to do so in a way that a bright 12-year-old with no experience with the subject would be able to understand. At that same time, I discovered that I really enjoyed talking about synthesis, recording, electronics, and music (which obviously are all connected), and I was fortunate to have many opportunities do so publicly. My years of experience writing, making tutorial videos, working as a clinician, and teaching in a school setting have helped me to dial in a training method that people seem to find easy to understand and sufficiently engaging, and even fun.

Products by Matt

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    tutorial video

    Ambient Patches with Strymon BigSky

    Few pedals lend themselves to creating lush sonic dreamscapes like the Strymon BigSky. In this video tutorial series, Strymon expert Matt Piper shows you everything you need to know to create wild, evolving ambient patches with this powerful effect pedal.

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Ambient Patches with Strymon BigSky is rated 3.0 out of 5 by 1.
Rated 3.0 out of 5 by from Barely covered the unit Way too much time wasted on saving. There are many more settings that were never covered - magneto for instance. The only reverb types covered were cloud, shimmer and bloom.
Date published: 2016-10-12