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Pro Tools Tutorial

Creating Game Audio with Pro Tools

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10 Videos
Length: 1hr 6min 55sec
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    Tutorial 1

    Introduction

    0:44

    A basic introduction and overview of the content of the video series.

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    Tutorial 2

    Pro Tools Overview

    4:04

    An overview of some essential Pro Tools features that viewers should know before proceeding.

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    Tutorial 3

    Unity Overview

    3:59

    An introduction to the Unity game engine including a tour of the main window.

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    Tutorial 4

    Flyer Zap

    7:33

    Using an electric guitar to create an electrical zap for the flying robot.

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    Tutorial 5

    Player Gun

    8:28

    Using a Slinky to create the sound of the players laser weapon.

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    Tutorial 6

    Mech Missile

    4:47

    Using the Signal Generator to create a whoosh sound for the boss mechs missiles.

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    Tutorial 7

    Player Footsteps Pt. 1

    11:31

    Recording footstep elements in the studio.

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    Tutorial 8

    Player Footsteps Pt. 2

    6:08

    Editing footsteps in Pro Tools.

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    Tutorial 9

    Robot Footsteps

    10:03

    Recording metal impacts and a remote control car to create the bot footsteps.

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    Tutorial 10

    Background Ambience

    9:38

    Using a garden hose to create a rain background, and using the Xpand!2 virtual instrument to create an interior space station hum.

The video gaming industry is beyond huge, and the opportunities in this field are endless. Professional game sound designer Eric Kuehnl shows you what it takes to create the sounds that bring video games to life!

Eric begins with overviews of essential Pro Tools features that new sound designers need to know, and then goes over the free Unity game engine software used in this tutorial series.

Eric then dives right into how he physically creates new sounds using found objects, live recordings, and samples for the various elements of the example game he creates.

Finally, you'll see how to process and finish the complex and complete sounds such as Flyer Zaps, Player Guns, Mech Missiles, Player Footsteps, Robot Footsteps, and Background Ambience in Pro Tools.

If you've ever wanted to create sounds for video games, or if you're a sound designer looking for some killer Pro Tools tips, watch "Creating Game Audio with Pro Tools" today!

soundbylaura
Submitted 10 months ago

Good tips and tricks

Been using Pro Tools for 15 years and I still learned some new tricks in this series. It was fun to see the different things you recorded for SFX. Needs a nice wrap-up, though. Feels cut off.

I am a: Professional, Musician, Sound Designer

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stevek
Submitted 1 year ago

Excellent series

The "Creating Game Audio with Pro Tools" tutorial series is an excellent view. Instructor has a belt full of industry experience and it definitely shows through this course.

I am a: Semi-Pro, Sound Designer, Producer, Game Designer, Musician

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1. When did you start dabbling in music?

I started piano lessons when I was five or six. My parents were both musicians so there was really no question that all of the kids would take piano as soon as we were old enough. I also sang in the church choir for a few years. Later, I studied tenor sax in school, and eventually switched to bass guitar and then upright bass as my primary instruments.

2. What training have you had?

When I was a kid growing up in Dayton, Ohio, I had a great teacher named Mike Overly who taught me first on keyboards and later on bass. He was a brilliant, very organized teacher. He writes all his own educational materials including the Guitar Encyclomedia. He got me into jazz and sophisticated pop music like Steely Dan when I was just a kid. Eventually, I attended the Oberlin Conservatory and California Institute of the Arts and completed degrees in electronic music. I had the good fortune of studying with some fantastic composers and performers including Mark Trayle, Mort Subotnick, and Wadada Leo Smith. I also spent an amazing summer in Paris studying electronic music at the UPIC (now CCMIX) studios of composer Iannis Xenakis. The primary instructor there was Curtis Roads (now at UC Santa Barbara) who is a truly brilliant instructor and composer. His The Computer Music Tutorial and Microsound books are required reading for anyone interested in electronic music. His work in granular synthesis sparked my lifelong obsession with that technique.

3. When did you get into recording?

I was very lucky to have a mother who was really supportive of my interest in music technology. I think she could see that it was more than just a passing interest, even when I was pretty young. I’d save up all my money from mowing lawns and such to buy gear, and she would match it. I had built up quite a nice little studio by the time I was in high school. I had a Korg Poly-61M and Poly-800 II, a Roland TR-707, a Roland S-50, an Ensoniq EPS, a Tascam Porta 02, an Atari Mega 4 ST running C-Lab Notator (which eventually became Logic) with the Unitor II synchronizer, a cheap 16-channel mixer of some kind, a Walkman Pro for mixdowns, and JBL Control 5 monitors with the subwoofer. When I think back now it was a pretty crazy setup! I would stripe LTC onto the fourth track of the Porta 02 so I could lock it up with the computer. At the time, I didn’t realize how advanced that was for a bedroom studio.

I was completely self-taught until I got to Oberlin. Even though I was studying electronic and computer music there, I didn’t really learn about studio recording in the classroom. My real education came from my work-study job recording classical and jazz performances several nights a week. That’s where I learned about microphone techniques, and how to get a professional sounding recording. It was like a miniature Tonmeister training program, even though we were just a bunch of kids making $4 an hour! It was also my first exposure to Pro Tools which we would occasionally use to piece together classical recordings. My mentor there was Mike Schulze who now runs the recording program at the University of Denver. His students win the Downbeat Magazine award for best engineered jazz recording pretty much every year.

4. People you have worked with/for?

I’ve worked as a composer, sound designer, and mixer on games developed by Novalogic, Sony Computer Entertainment America, Factor 5, Technicolor, Namco Bandai, Ninja Theory, and Juice. I’ve also worked as a supervising sound editor and re-recording mixer on a bunch of independent films and documentaries. As a Pro Tools and studio tech my clients have included Skywalker Sound, Pixar, American Zoetrope, Fantasy Studios, One Union, Polarity Post, The Plant, The Grateful Dead, Metallica, Santana, Amon Tobin, Blackalicious, and a ton of other awesome studios and artists.

5. Why are you so good at training people?

I began training people as a teaching assistant when I was in graduate school at CalArts. I had to teach MOTU’s Digital Performer and Yamaha FM synthesis to bunch of kids fresh out of high school, which was one of the toughest jobs I’ve ever had! It took a lot of dedication and patience to make the concepts clear to students coming from all different backgrounds.

I’ve been training professionals since 2000. Initially, I was helping professional engineers learn new gear and streamline their music and post workflows based around Pro Tools. I joined the training department at Digidesign in 2003 and ran the product specialist training programs, as well as contributing to the new (at that time) end-user certification curriculum. As the program grew, I made the transition to exclusively training instructors at many of the music colleges around the country (and the world) including Full Sail, Ex’pression College, Musician’s Institute, Savannah College of Art & Design, USC, L.A. Recording School, L.A. Film School, the Art Institutes, and the list goes on and on. There are over 400 schools teaching that curriculum today, and I’m still involved with much of the instructor certification as one of only a handful of Avid Master Instructors.

I’ve also taught music technology at a number of colleges including Academy of Art (San Francisco) and San Francisco State University. I’m currently the assistant director of the Music Technology Program at Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. We’ve got an Associate’s Degree and bunch of professional certificates in Music Technology, with over 40 classes available in the classroom and online. Working with young musicians and engineers can be very challenging at times, but it’s also incredibly rewarding when you hear a student project that sounds totally professional!

Products by Eric

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    tutorial video

    Creating Game Audio with Pro Tools

    The video gaming industry is beyond huge, and the opportunities in this field are endless. Professional game sound designer Eric Kuehnl shows you what it takes to create the sounds that bring video games to life!

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Creating Game Audio with Pro Tools is rated 5.0 out of 5 by 2.
Rated 5.0 out of 5 by from Good tips and tricks Been using Pro Tools for 15 years and I still learned some new tricks in this series. It was fun to see the different things you recorded for SFX. Needs a nice wrap-up, though. Feels cut off.
Date published: 2016-05-31
Rated 5.0 out of 5 by from Excellent series The "Creating Game Audio with Pro Tools" tutorial series is an excellent view. Instructor has a belt full of industry experience and it definitely shows through this course.
Date published: 2016-03-29